15,000 March in 4 Australian cities to protest against Adani coal mining project

As many as 15,000 people are claimed to have marched in Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney and Cairns demanding that permissions to Adani’s mega coal mine in Australia be withdrawn. Responding to Adani’s announcement that it would start work by Christmas, and led by school students and first nations people, snap marches took place in the four cities.
Meanwhile, a new national ReachTel poll said that eight out of 10 Labor Party voters want to #StopAdani, while nine out of 10 Labour Party voters support students’ right to demand climate action. The marches come after thousands of school students walked out of school last Friday around the nation to demand urgent climate action, as bushfires raged across the country and two states continued in the drip of crippling drought.
Kelly Albion, campaigns and communications director with the Australian Youth Climate Coalition said: “If Labor doesn’t oppose Adani now, it will haunt them every day of the Federal election campaign and beyond. We will put climate change front and centre and make politicians’ position on Adani the litmus test for whether they have what it takes to stop the climate crisis.”

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