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Veteran Bihar land rights activist on how land reforms became defunct in state

Human rights defender Vidya Bhushan Rawat talks to Pankaj Singh, a veteran land rights activist based in Champaran, Bihar. One who was arrested for raising the issues of the backward Mushahar community's land rights, he remained in jail for several months till the Patna High Court granted him bail. 
One who participated in the Jay Prakash Narayan (JP) movement in 1974-75, when chief minister Nitish Kumar himself was a part of it, Pankaj Singh asks uncomfortable questions about why Kumar is not keen to discuss and debate the Bandhopadhyay Commission Report.
Rawat says, "We all are speaking about farmers' issues and we stand with them, but this interview will gives one a glimpse of how the Zamindari Abolition Act and the Land Ceiling Act in Bihar became defunct." He wonders, "Will the government act and undo the historical wrongs with Bihar's most marginalised communities". 
Sharing a conversation Rawat had with Pankaj Singh.

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