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Why should rich country like Canada collect vaccines much beyond its requirement?

In conversation with human rights defender Vidya Bhushan Rawat, former United Nations diplomat Bruce H Moore, who has served as boards of several NGOs and institutes, including Transparency International Canada, Institute for Global Food Security at the McGill University, Canadians for Tax Fairness, Forum for Democratic Global Governance and the Huairou Commission (an international alliance of grassroots women’s organizations), speaks about growing inequality and food crisis in the post-Covid world.
One who served from 2013 in Moscow through 2018 as member of C20, a civil society consultative body to G20 countries, Moore regrets, the world’s rich nations have shown their hypocrisy by quickly amassing vaccines, refusing to bother about the poor countries, wondering why should a country like Canada collect vaccines much beyond the requirement for its citizens. “What is the use?”, he asks.
A prominent name among international civil society organisations, Moore was the first director of the Rome-based International Land Coalition from 1998 to 2008, a global alliance of civil society, UN and intergovernmental organisations working to enable poor rural families to gain their land and resource rights. He has also chaired the NGO advisory committee to the UN International Fund for Agricultural Development, served on the International Executive of the Society for International Development, chaired policy dialogues during the UN Commission on Sustainable Development, and served on the Commission on the Legal Empowerment of the Poor.
Currently president of the North Frontenac Lake Association Alliance, a forum where 21 lake associations engage with rural residents to educate and advocate for environmentally sustainable development, Bruce feels strongly about the manner in which authoritarian governments are targeting human rights defenders and political opponents, which he opines is a very serious development needing to be countered at all available platforms.
Even as expressing his desire to work for all like-minded organisations and share his experience and knowledge with them, he believes, land reforms are extremely important for the alleviation of poverty, insisting, civil society organisations need to work on issues of rural poor, as the situation is growing from bad to worse for them.

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