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About This Site

I started blogging in May 2011, when I was with the Times of India’s Gandhinagar representative, looking after Gujarat government. The credit for this goes to Bharat Desai, who was editor of the paper then. I was discussing with him how, when I went to see a Gandhi museum on the spot of yet-to-built Mahatma Mandir, I saw life-size, even bigger, photos and cut outs of Narendra Modi, then Gujarat chief minister. The Modi displays outsmarted those of the Mahatma, not to talk of other national movement leaders. 
“I am reminded of what I saw when I was in Cuba in 1985 for a ‘Patriot’ assignment”, I told him. “I saw larger than life screens showing Cuban leader Fidel Castro giving speeches... Screens were on roads, in hotel where we stayed, everywhere.” Prompt came Desai’s advise: “Why not write a blog on this?” A blog? Only a chosen few in the Times of India were allowed, I thought. But I was happy. 
He chose me, forwarded my first blog, and it was published. Thereafter, I wrote 86 blogs for the Times of India. All of them were called True Lies blogs, the last one being “The Wavering Vaghela” in July 2017, which was removed from the site (republished here) after publishing it, with no reasons given.
No complaints, part of many journalistic hazards, I thought, but stopped writing blogs for the Times of India thereafter. I argued with myself: Why not spend time instead on writing stories for my own news site, Counterview, which is an open forum, where all can write? This is what I have been almost exclusively doing since July 2017. 
In this site, I have sought to revive my blogging skills, whatever they are left of me. The reason is simple: All journalistic stories cannot be blogs. The space for stories is Counterview.  Nearly a
ll the Times  of India blogs written in first person, reproduced in this blog, were first published here.
After all, by definition a blog considered a truncation of "weblog", is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web (www) consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries. Seventy-nine of 86 Times of India blogs fall in this category, hence I have reproduced them in this blog.
Please feel free to read, comment, react, criticize. 
Click HERE to read more about me.
Email id: counterview.in@gmail.com

TRENDING

Why this marriage of son of non-IAS babu, earlier in Gujarat, became an event in Kerala

AK Vijay Kumar Many say, marriages are made in heaven. However, as a confirmed non-believer, I don’t seem to think that way. But if one were to believe that marriages are indeed made in heaven, would the guests who are invited in some of the high-profile weddings also decide the destiny of the newly weds? I don’t know. Yet, the fact is, the competition to invite guests at such weddings is something I noticed after I came to Ahmedabad in 1993 to join as assistant editor of the Times of India.

Caste is the bones, race the skin. Caste is fixed and rigid, race is fluid and superficial

In her book , “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents,” Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson, making an interesting observation, argues the United States’ racial hierarchy should be thought of as a caste system, similar to that in India.  Reproduced below are excerpts from the transcript of her video interview with Juan Gonz├ílez and Amy Goodman published in “Democracy Now”: ***

IIM-Indore students anonymously compain: Authorities ignore their Covid concern

An email alert received by me from a 2020 batch alum of the Indian Institute of Management (IIM)-Indore has forwarded a mail received by this person regarding "concerns of the current students towards the top business institute's Indore branch's authorities' alleged "disregard" towards the management of the Covid-19-related situation on-campus.