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Folk singer Mukund Nayak on Adivasi identity, jal-jungle-zameen, untouchability issues

Mukund Nayak has been a prominent cultural voice in Jharkhand, who has staged live performances worldwide as well as in India. He was awarded with Padmashree by the Government of India several years ago. Sharing his video conversation which took place about three years ago, Vidya Bhushan Rawat, a human rights defender says, the prominent folk singer, songwriter and dancer talks about Jharkhand's Adivasi identity, issues of jal-jungle-zameen (water-forests-land), impact of the outsiders’ onslaught on Jharkhand, caste and untouchability issues.
Born in in Bokba village of Simdega district, Bihar (now Jharkhand) in 1949, Nayak is also recipient of the Padma Shri and Sangeet Natak Akademi Award. He belongs to a family of Ghasi community, who are traditionally musicians.
With aim to preserve traditional folk arts, Nayak had started performing songs in public places with other cultural activist like Bharat Nayak, Bhavya Nayak, Praful Kumar Rai, Lal Ranvir Nath Shahdeo and Kshitij Kumar. In 1974, he joined Akashvani as performer. His first performance at larger audience was at Jaganathpur Mela in Ranchi. 
In 1980, when regional and tribal language department formed in Ranchi University, he became associated with the University. In 1981, he came in contact with Dr Carol Merry Baby researcher on Karam music of South Bihar and got a chance to work with her.
In 1988, his troupe performed at the third Hong Kong International Dance festival of the Hong Kong Institute for the Promotion of Chinese Culture. In 1985, he established an organisation "Kunjban" to promote Nagpuri culture. Kunjban promotes Nagpuri culture, especially Nagpuri Jhumar. 
The video conversation:

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